Bridging the Classroom-Library Divide

bridging

The purpose of this presentation is to explain our rationale and to kick start ideas for you to use in your school.  This is definitely not the only way to do things, and in constant tweaking here in our District.  This multi-year project is the result of collaboration among classroom teachers, the media specialist, and the technology department.  As will most everything else in life, relationships are key to successful outcomes.  Links to resources to start your own program is available here.

In short, I collaborated with the Library Media Specialist (Alayna Davies-Smith), the National Junior Honors Society, the Student Council, and the two eighth grade Advanced ELA teachers at our junior highs.  We identified a need for additional resources to cover Common Core standards, including digital literacy.  We created audio books for the elementary classrooms, and added augmented reality (using Aurasma) reviews onto books in the junior high libraries.  Students then created websites using Google Sites that highlighted a book’s author, theme, plot, characters, etc., and we put QR codes to those sites on the appropriate book.  Students with mobile devices can then access a video review by their peers as well as an in-depth analysis of the text, also by their peers.

This is the presentation for the upcoming Midwest Educational Technology Conference.  It was created with Haiku Deck, and to find the nitty-gritty, you need to read the notes.

https://www.haikudeck.com/p/DqlAgjnHLQ/bridging-classroom-library-divide

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TextHelp: One of the New Add-Ons in GDocs

This week, a powerful new feature appeared on Google Docs.  You and your students can now run little sub-programs called ‘scripts’ on your Documents. These scripts can be found in the new ‘Add-ons’  button located in the main ribbon:
Add-ons new
There are tools in there for making bibliographies, adding charts, making labels, flowcharts/mindmaps, tables of contents, and even for writing music.  The one that caught my eye is the highlighting tool called TextHelp.
TextHelp
Students can highlight parts of a text in different colors, and then this script will collect the different colored highlights together in a new document. Check out this page of suggestions on how to use this in the classroom.
How else could this be used with students?