Great Example of Kindergarten Math

 

 

 

 

In Kindergarten math today during #noworksheetweek, the kids had to solve a problem.  It seems that the farmyard cat made the animals mad.  They chased him, and, in the process, ruined all their pens!

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Students estimated how much building material would be needed to make new pens.

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The kids then charted their estimations, and then checked them by building new pens.

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Then they reviewed, charted, and discussed their findings, and fixed the farmyard!

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…and the teacher was told that her students never want to see their math workbook ever again!

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Brilliant!

 

3 Ah-ha Moments of #NoWorksheetWeek

It’s been twNWWribbono days.

In the two days since #NoWorksheetWeek started, our Literacy Coach and I have visited the classroom of all 62 participants in our district, welcoming them to the week, presenting them with a badge to post with pride (picture), cheering them on, listening to first impressions, and observing all the great activities.

Some were nervous, checking with us to be sure that what they were doing fit within the realm of ‘No Worksheets’.

Some were excited, proudly inviting us in, introducing us to their students, and showing off their kids’ work.

Some were scared, thinking we were coming in to evaluate or critique.

One actually thanked me for putting this whole challenge together.

For the most part, teachers were already having those Ah-ha moments we were hoping for.  One teacher (kindergarten) went through the worksheets she had already printed for next week, and weeded out several, because she learned how she could accomplish the same goals orally.  Another teacher (6 grade social studies) is making paper like the Egyptians used to (with the addition of an electric blender!) using all the unused worksheets.  A third (junior high intervention) threatened her kids with, “If you don’t quiet down, we’ll have to do a worksheet!”  and immediately realized that giving worksheets is a punishment.

Perfect.

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Here is the badge, in case you would like to use it, too.  It was originally made on Canva.com:

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Breaking in to Corporate America: (Im)possible?

In my inbox today, I found an email from LinkedIn telling me about a job that would be perfect for me:  Manager of Curriculum Development at Charter Communications (a huge cable TV/network company).  The title made it sound like it was right up my alley, so I clicked through to read more about it.  The initial paragraph sounded like a head of Professional Development for a school district.  Great!  Sign me up.  Down at the bottom, under “Preferred Qualifications,” (and aside from the ‘knowledge of cable television products and services a plus’) it sounded like everything a teacher or school administrator does.

YET nowhere under “Education (level and type)” did it mention Education as an acceptable degree.

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When will educators be recognized as having experience in training?  Who else has more practical knowledge of content delivery systems, facilitation, and presentation?  It just irks me that we are not respected enough to be considered as viable candidates for the corporate world.

I think I’ll apply and see what happens.